Lithospermum species

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Scientific Name Lithospermum caroliniense USDA PLANTS Symbol
LICA13
Common Name Carolina Puccoon ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
31946
Family Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat: Sandy soils in open areas of prairies and forest edges.
Plant: Upright, leafy perennial 12 to 24 inches tall; single or often multiple shaggy stems, branching near tops.
Leaves: Alternate, lanceolate to linear, sessile and hairy; 1-1/4 to 2-1/2 inches long, about 1/4-inch wide.
Inflorescence: Initially congested clusters (cymes) becoming elongated later; bright yellow flowers, 1 inch across or less, subtended by overlapping, lanceolate to ovate rough bracts; funnel-shaped corolla tube with 5 broad, flaring lobes (petals) with rounded tips; 5 stamens.
Bloom Period: March to May.
References: "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilvsgi, "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, and SEINet.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Lithospermum incisum USDA PLANTS Symbol
LIIN2
Common Name Fringed Puccoon ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
31940
Family Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat: All soil types, but usually in sandy soils; open areas of prairies and forest edges.
Plant: Upright, leafy perennial 6 to 12 inches tall; single or often multiple soft-hairy stems, branching near tops.
Leaves: Alternate, linear to linear-lanceolate , sessile and surfaces with appressed hairs; 1 to 2 inches long, less than 1/4-inch wide.
Inflorescence: Bright yellow spring flowers are 1 inch long and 1/2-inch wide and sterile, in terminal, leafy-bracted racemes; funnel-shaped corolla tube with 5 broad, flaring lobes (petals) with fringed (incised) edges; 5 stamens. Reproductive (cleistogamous) flowers are produced in late spring and summer, very small and inconspicuous.
Bloom Period: March to May.
References: "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilvsgi, "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, and "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist.
Texas Status
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2019