Zephyranthes species

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Scientific Name Zephyranthes chlorosolen (Cooperia drummondii) USDA PLANTS Symbol
CODR2
Common Name Evening Rain-lily ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
810213
Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Wide range of soils and conditions.
Plant: Erect perennial, single unbranched, leafless stem 4 to 13 inches tall.
Leaves: Two to five basal, narrow linear gray-green leaves, 12 inches long, less than 1/4-inch wide.
Inflorescence: Single trumpet-shaped white, fragrant flower with 3 petals and 3 sepals, up to 2 inches across; floral tube 3 to 7 inches tall, white, sometimes tinged or veined pink, green below; 4 to 8 stamens and white style.
Bloom Period: September and October, sometimes as early as June, and most often after rains; flower expands in the evenings and may last 4 days.
References: www.wildflower.org, SEINet and "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Zephyranthes drummondii (Cooperia pedunculata) USDA PLANTS Symbol
COPE
Common Name Hill Country Rain-lily, Prairie Lily ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
523633
Family Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Sandy, rocky, usually calcareous soils.
Plant: Erect perennial, single unbranched, leafless stem 6 to 18 inches tall.
Leaves: Five to six basal, narrow linear gray-green leaves, parallel–veined with many veins, midrib absent; 6+ inches long, 1/4-inch wide, broadening to 1/2-inch at base.
Inflorescence: Single trumpet-shaped fragrant flower with 3 petals and 3 sepals, up to 2 inches across; pure white aging with rose–purple veins; floral tube 1-1/8 to 1-5/8 inches tall, white, sometimes pink-tinged or veined, green below; 6 stamens with pale yellow anthers; white style.
Bloom Period: September and October, sometimes as early as June, and most often after rains, lasting a day or two.
References: www.wildflower.org, Vascular Plants of Williamson County, SEINet and "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston.
Texas Status
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2019