Euphorbia species

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Scientific Name Euphorbia corollata USDA PLANTS Symbol
EUCO10
Common Name Flowering Spurge ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
28057
Family Euphorbiaceae (Spurge) SEINet Reference
Click Here
Description Habitat: Prairies, open fields and woods, roadsides, disturbed areas.
Plant: Erect annual less than 1 foot to more than 3 feet tall, often bent over; much-branched in upper portion of stem.
Leaves: Stem leaves alternate, linear to elliptic 1-1/8 to 2-3/8 inches long; smaller, opposite leaves below the branches and near the blossoms.
Inflorescence: Open panicles of very small white blossoms atop branches; flowers monoecious, 5 white bracts resemble petals; those of female blossoms with yellow bases and tripartite style; male blossoms have several stamens
Fruit: Small, 3-lobed, green, fruit capsule less than 1/4 inch long.
References: Descr. adapted from Illinois Wildlowers and SEINet.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Euphorbia eriantha USDA PLANTS Symbol
EUER2
Common Name Beetle Spurge, Woolly-flower Spurge ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
28063
Family Euphorbiaceae (Spurge) SEINet Reference
Click Here
Description Habitat: Gravely, dry, hot areas, hillsides, and canyons.
Plant: Erect annual 6 to 20 inches tall tangled with many branching stems.
Leaves: Very narrow, alternate linear leaves 1 to 3 inches long.
Inflorescence: Many (>25) tiny white flowers in a few hairy clusters at the ends of the branches; male (staminate) and female (pistillate) flowers are separate.
Fruit: Female flower becoming a small green, hairy fruit capsule less than 1/4 inch long.
References: Decr. adapted from SEINet.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Euphorbia marginata USDA PLANTS Symbol
EUMA8
Common Name Snow-on-the-mountain ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
28098
Family Euphorbiaceae (Spurge) Wildflower Center Ref.
Click Here
Description Habitat: Partly-sunny, dryer areas, gravelly soils.
Plant: Erect open annual 1 to 3 feet tall with several branches originating at leaf axils; lower stems reddish brown as the plant matures; upper stems hairy.
Leaves: Alternate cupped lower leaves, sessile (no stalks), ovate to lanceolate, 1 to 3 inches long; near inflorescence leaves become narrower and have white margins.
Inflorescence: Several blossom heads atop each branch and white-margined leaves; each blossom is a cyathium, a cup formed by white bracts which contain very small, separate male and female flowers. For a detailed description click here.
References: Descr. adapted from "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist.
Texas Status
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2017