Ageratina species

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Scientific Name Ageratina havanensis (Eupatorium havanense) USDA PLANTS Symbol
AGHA4
Common Name Shrubby Boneset, Havana Snakeroot ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
36468
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat: Rocky bluffs, limestone outcrops and slopes, ledges along streams, often in oak-juniper woodlands.
Plant: Rounded perennial shrub, 1 to 5 feet tall, with many much-branched stems.
Leaves: Opposite, roughly deltoid (triangular) to ovate or narrower, up 1 to 2 inches long, with 3 main veins; edges wavy to coarsely toothed; pointed tips.
Inflorescence: Terminal clusters of 15 to 20 pinkish-white flowers; ray flowers absent; florets with 5-toothed corollas (resembling tiny petals) and long, protruding styles; prolific, long-lasting, fragrant.
Bloom Period: May to November.
References: SEINet, "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist and "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Ageratina wrightii (Eupatorium wrightii) USDA PLANTS Symbol
AGWR2
Common Name Wright's Snakeroot, Wright Ageratina ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
36477
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat: Dry areas on open or wooded rocky slopes at higher elevations in the Big Bend.
Plant: Short, rounded shrub, usually less than 2 feet tall, with many short, tangled, leafy stems.
Leaves: Opposite or almost so, rounded ovate-deltoid (triangular) up to 3/4-inch across with blunt tips and 3 main veins; short, narrowly-winged petioles; blade edges smooth or with 3 to 7 very short teeth on each side (shallowly crenate).
Inflorescence: Terminal clusters of 10 to 12 white to pinkish, tubular flowers; ray flowers absent; florets with 5-toothed corollas (resembling tiny petals).
Bloom Period: July to November.
References: SEINet, "Little Big Bend" by Roy Morey and "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston.
Texas Status
Native

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© Tom Lebsack 2018