Salvia species [Lamiaceae]

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Scientific Name Salvia coccinea USDA PLANTS Symbol SACO5
Common Name Tropical Sage, Blood Sage ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 32682
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Wildflower Center Ref. Click Here
Description Habitat: Sandy soils in brushy areas and open woods.
Plant: Erect perennial 1 to 3 feet tall, multiple leafy stems, branched in upper portion.
Leaves: Deltoid to ovate, veined leaves 2-3/4 inches long on petioles 3/8 to 1-3/8 inches long; rounded teeth around margins.
Inflorescence: Racemes of well-separated clusters of 2 to 6 bright red to dark scarlet (rarely pink or white) flowers; corolla tube about 1-inch long protruding from calyx; upper lobe about half as long as lower lobe; protruding forked stamens.
Bloom Period: February to December.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston and "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilvsgi.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Salvia greggii USDA PLANTS Symbol SAGR4
Common Name Autumn Sage ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 32689
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Wildflower Center Ref. Click Here
Description Habitat: Rocky soils in open areas of brush, woodlands and canyons; popular landscape plant in Central Texas.
Plant: Erect, much-branched evergreen perennial shrub with leafy, somewhat woody stems; 2 to 3 feet tall.
Leaves: Small obovate to elliptic leaves 3/8 to 1-inch long with rounded tips; short petioles.
Inflorescence: Loose, terminal racemes of small flowers with two-lipped normally red, but also pink, purple, orange, or white, corollas.
Bloom Period: Spring to fall.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Wildflowers of Texas" by Michael Eason and Wildflower Center.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Salvia penstemonoides USDA PLANTS Symbol SAPE6
Common Name Big Red Sage ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 504997
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Missouri Bot. Garden Ref. Click Here
Description Habitat: Rocky areas along seeps or creeks.
Plant: Erect, strong, perennial with multiple stems up to 3 or more feet tall.
Leaves: Narrow dark green stem leaves opposite, lanceolate; lower leaves 3 to 5+ inches long and petiolate; upper leaves much smaller and nearly sessile.
Inflorescence: Two-lipped, dark red penstemon-like flowers in terminal racemes 8 to 12 inches long; each 1 to 1-1/2 inches long, upper lip extending beyond lower.
Bloom Period: June to October.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Wildflowers of Texas" by Michael Eason and www.missouribotanicalgarden.org.
Notes: Found in only a few areas on the Edwards Plateau. Thought to be extinct until the 1980s when it was rediscovered my Marshall Enquist. Photos below taken at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Salvia regla USDA PLANTS Symbol SARE4
Common Name Mountain Sage ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 32738
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) SEINet
Reference
Click Here
Description Habitat: Wooded, rocky slopes at mid- to higher elevations in the Chisos Mtns of Big Bend, and northern Mexico.
Plant: Leafy, much-branched shrub with many basal stems, 2 to 6 feet tall.
Leaves: Dark green deltoid or ovate leaves up to 2 inches long and wide with coarsely-toothed edges; upper surface smooth, gladular-hairy beneath.
Inflorescence: Clusters of one to a few two-lipped, scarlet flowers, from leaf axils or in short terminal racemes; each up to 2 inches long.
Bloom Period: June to September.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston and "Little Big Bend" by Roy Morey.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Salvia roemeriana USDA PLANTS Symbol SARO3
Common Name Cedar Sage ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 504998
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Wildflower Center Ref. Click Here
Description Habitat: Rocky, wooded areas in Central Texas; often found in the shade of Ashe Juniper (Juniperus ashei) trees.
Plant: Erect to reclining multi-stemmed perennial with stems 1 to 2 feet long.
Leaves: Upper leaves nearly round or cordate to reniform, 1 to 2 inches across, hairy with scalloped edges on long petioles; lower leaves may be compound with smaller leaflets.
Inflorescence: Loose, elongated terminal racemes of bright red 1 to 1-1/4 inch-long flowers with two-lipped corollas; spreading lower lip has deeply cleft lobes; two protruding stamens.
Bloom Period: March to August.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Wildflowers of Texas" by Michael Eason and "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native

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© Tom Lebsack 2019