Mimosa species

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Scientific Name Mimosa borealis USDA PLANTS Symbol
MIBO2
Common Name Fragrant Mimosa, Pink Mimosa ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
26783
Family Fabaceae (Pea) Texas A&M Reference
Description Habitat: Dry soils in brushy areas, flats and hillsides.
Plant: Rounded, much-branched shrub 3 to 6 feet tall; slightly zig-zagging stems have ridges and sparse single recurved prickles.
Leaves: Bi-pinnately compound with 2 to 3 pairs of primary leaflets and 3 to 6 pairs of secondary leaflets, oblong to ovate, each about 1/8 to 1/4-inch long.
Inflorescence: Dense white to pink, ball-shaped inflorescence about 1/2-inch in diameter with many very small individual flowers each with 5 petals and 8 to 11 protruding stamens with dark pink filaments, aging lighter and yellow to pinkish anthers.
Bloom Period: March to May.
Fruit: Fruit pod less than 1/4-inch long, with a few prickles on lower edge.
References: Vascular Plants of Williamson County, "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist, and "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Mimosa emoryana USDA PLANTS Symbol
MIEM
Common Name Emory Mimosa ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
26785
Family Fabaceae (Pea) Texas A&M Reference
Description low shrub to 3-1/2 feet high with slim grooved stems with recurved prickles; small leaves with tiny hairs; pink flower heads less than 1 inch across. Habitat: Desert environment; gravelly limestone and igneous soils in brushy flats and on slopes.
Plant: Low-growing, straggling branched shrub up to 3-1/2 feet tall; branches with numerous short recurved prickles; branches may be lined or grooved.
Leaves: Bi-pinnately compound with 1 to 3 pairs further divided into 3 to 6 pairs of small leaflets 1/8-inch or less long, covered with very fine hairs.
Inflorescence: Dense ball-shaped inflorescence about 1/2-inch across with many very small individual flowers each with 5 petals and 10 protruding stamens with pink filaments and yellow anthers.
Bloom Period: May to July.
Fruit: Fruit pod about 1-3/8 inches long and 1/4-inch or less across, covered with short yellow prickles.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston and "Little Big Bend" by Roy Morey.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Mimosa nuttallii USDA PLANTS Symbol
MINU6
Common Name Nuttall's Sensitive-briar, Catclaw Sensitive-briar ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
507832
Family Fabaceae (Pea) Encyclopedia of Life Ref.
Description Habitat: Sandy or silty soils in disturbed areas, grasslands, woodland openings.
Plant: Trailing, prostrate, branched perennial, ribbed stems 2 to 6 feet long with recurved (bent-back) prickles.
Leaves: Bi-pinnately compound on prickly stalks with 4 to 8 pairs of primary leaflets, each 1 to 2 inches long, divided into 8 to 15 pairs of small secondary leaflets each 5/16-inch long that fold up when disturbed; each leaflet has a conspicuous midrib and sideribs beneath.
Inflorescence: Dense pink, ball-shaped inflorescence 1/2 to 3/4-inch in diameter with many very small individual flowers each with 5 petals and 8 to 12 protruding stamens with pink filaments and yellow anthers.
Bloom Period: April to September.
Fruit: Mature fruit is nearly cylindrically-shaped.
References: "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilsvgi and Kansas Wildflowers and Grasses.
Notes: Leaflets are sensitive to touch and will fold up when disturbed. Very similar to M. roemeriana, below except for conspicuous midribs on leaflets, fruit shape and ribbed stems.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Mimosa roemeriana USDA PLANTS Symbol
MIRO6
Common Name Roemer's Mimosa, Sensitive-briar ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
507833
Family Fabaceae (Pea) Wildflower Center Ref.
Description Habitat: Common on rocky, chalky or sandy soils in North Central Texas and on the Edwards Plateau.
Plant: Trailing, prostrate, branched perennial, stems 12 to 40 inches long with recurved (bent-back) prickles; lower portion of stem rounded.
Leaves: Bi-pinnately compound on prickly stalks with 2 to 6 pairs of primary leaflets divided into several pairs of small secondary leaflets that fold up when disturbed; each leaflet is smooth beneath (no conspicuous midrib and sideribs).
Inflorescence: Dense pink, ball-shaped inflorescence 3/4 to 1 inch in diameter with many very small individual flowers each with 5 petals and 8 to 12 protruding stamens with pink filaments and yellow anthers.
Bloom Period: April to June.
Fruit: Mature fruit noticeably flattened, 3 to 6 times wider than thick.
References: Shinners & Mahler's Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas pp. 677-682 and www.wildflower.org.
Notes: Leaflets are sensitive to touch and will fold up when disturbed. Very similar to M. nuttallii, above except for lack of conspicuous midribs on leaflets, fruit shape and rounded stems.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Mimosa turneri (Mimosa zygophylla) USDA PLANTS Symbol
MITU
Common Name Desert Mimosa ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
503839
Family Fabaceae (Pea) Texas A&M Reference
Description Habitat: Dry desert habitats in limestone or sandy soils, along washes and gullies.
Plant: Straggling branched shrub, 3 to 6 feet tall; branches with numerous recurved prickles; branches streaked with broad, dark lines.
Leaves: Bi-pinnately compound with 1 or 2 pairs of primary leaflets further divided into 1 or 2 pairs of small secondary leaflets; smooth, almost hairless.
Inflorescence: Dense ball-shaped inflorescence about 1/2-inch across with many very small individual flowers each with 5 petals and 8 to 10 protruding stamens with pink filaments and yellow anthers.
Bloom Period: May-July.
Fruit: Fruit pod 3/8 to 1-3/16 inches long and 1/4-inch or less across, relatively smooth with a few prickles along the edges.
References: Mimosa zygophylla in "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston and "Little Big Bend" by Roy Morey.
Texas Status
Native



© Tom Lebsack 2019