Scutellaria species

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Scientific Name Scutellaria drummondii USDA PLANTS Symbol
SCDR2
Common Name Drummond's Skullcap ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
32795
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Wildflower Center Ref.
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Description Habitat: Moist or dry limey soils. Very common in Central Texas.
Plant: Annual with several erect or reclining, 6 to 12 inches tall. Stems with relatively long, often gland-tipped, hairs.
Leaves: Ovate leaves 1/4 to 3/4-inch long on short petioles (stems) lower, sessile (no petioles) above.
Inflorescence: Flowers with 5 sepals and 5 bluish-purple petals united to form a lipped blossom about 1/2-inch long; lower lip is notched. Calyx with long hairs.
Reference: Excerpts from "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist, "Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas" by Shinner & Mahler, and www.wildflower.org.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Scutellaria ovata USDA PLANTS Symbol
SCOV
Common Name Heartleaf Skullcap ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
32772
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Encyclopedia of Life Ref.
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Description Habitat: Moist or dry, sandy, limey soils.
Plant: Erect perennial, one or more stems 9 to 30 inches tall, branched in upper section.
Leaves: Opposite leaves along each stem, blades are 1-4 inches long, cordate-shaped, deeply veined, toothed edges. Lower leaves have stalks, upper leaves stalkless.
Inflorescence: Flowers with 5 pale to dark blue petals united at base into a slender tube; two petals united forming upper, hooded lip, bottom three petals forming a much larger lower lip with center petal having a white throat with dark speckles.
Reference: Excerpts from "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilvsgi.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Scutellaria wrightii USDA PLANTS Symbol
SCWR2
Common Name Wright's Skullcap, Bushy Skullcap ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
32782
Family Lamiaceae (Mint) Wildflower Center Ref.
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Description Habitat: Roadsides, caliche soils, dry areas. Less common in Central Texas than S. drummondii
Plant: Perennial with numerous erect and curved branches arising from a woody base, forming clumps 6 to 12 inches tall. Stems without long, glandular hairs.
Leaves: Ovate hairy leaves 3/8-inch long.
Inflorence: Small violet-blue flowers, 3/8 inch long, calyx without long hairs. Skullcaps can be distinguished from other mints by the crest at the top of the blossom.
Reference: Excerpts from "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist and "Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas" by Shinner & Mahler.
Texas Status
Native



© Tom Lebsack 2017